Man holding a postit that says "AI", photo by Hitesh Choudhary on Unsplash

HBP puts the European Union Assessment List for Trustworthy AI to the test

The ethical and social implications of using artificial intelligence in life science – or society – have become the main hurdle for implementation. The debate has intensified in recent years, bringing a long list of solutions in the form of approaches, tools and initiatives. One of the more prominent examples of this is the European…

Diversity in Brain Research: Does it matter? 18 May 2022

Webinar 18 May 2022: Diversity in Brain Research: Does it matter?

To which extent are brain functions affected by sex hormones? Are sex differences at the level of stem cells relevant? Is it possible to differentiate biological sex from other factors that can influence the brain, like culture or life experiences? Can it be ethically justified to only study homogenous groups when diagnosing and treating diseases,…

The neuroethics contribution to AI ethics and regulation

The AI ethics research field is growing rapidly. So is the number of guidelines issued to provide operational recommendations to manage the ethical issues raised by AI design, development and implementation. In a recent Neuroethics publication, Michele Farisco, Kathinka Evers and Arleen Salles suggest some of the applied issues covered by these guidelines can in…

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Calling all professionals working with Disorders of Consciousness!

As part of the International Brain Injury Association’s Disorders of Consciousness Special Interest Group, we invite professionals working in the field to request their participation in a survey. The intent is to explore professional opinions relevant to the recommendations included in the newly issued Guidelines on Disorders of Consciousness from the European Academy of Neurology…

brain

Digital twins & virtual brains: the importance of conceptual clarity and transparency

Researchers are trying to develop digital twins of the human brain by building so-called ‘virtual brains’. Trying to create virtual copies of such a complex organ, that we know increasingly yet still very little about is a great challenge. In a recent publication, Kathinka Evers and Arleen Salles explore philosophical and neuroethical challenges associated with…

Arleen Salles

The value of neuroethics and philosophical reflection in the Human Brain Project

The Human Brain Project is committed to implementing responsibility in research and innovation practices. But implementing responsibility means more than setting standards or enforcing compliance. It also means changing mindsets and promoting an ethical culture: A culture where scientific excellence also includes ethical excellence. In the Human Brain Project, we are integrating neuroethics and philosophy…

brain

Neuroimages, artificial intelligence & re-identification of research subjects

Taking images of the brain using magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI for short, also captures the face. For a long time, techniques that remove facial features from neuroimages have allowed for open sharing of anonymised neuroimages. But new developments in artificial intelligence and machine learning have made it possible to re-create the removed facial features…

Designing a responsible neuroscience research infrastructure

Over the past 8 years, the Human Brain Project (HBP) has tested the strengths and limitations of responsible research & innovation, also known as RRI. To mark the ten-year anniversary of RRI, a group of HBP researchers now share what can be learned from implementing this concept in a large multi-disciplinary research project. This includes…

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Can you be cloned?

Why can we feel metaphysical nausea at the thought of cloned humans? I guess it has to do with how we, without giving ourselves sufficient time to reflect, are captivated by a simple image of individuality and cloning. The image then controls our thinking. We may imagine that cloning consists in multiplying our unique individuality in the…